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Modern Roses: Rosa 'Susan Williams-Ellis'

Botanical name: Rosa 'Susan Williams-Ellis'

Common name: English Rose

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Photo credit: David Austin 2011
Modern Roses: Rosa 'Susan Williams-Ellis'
Sprite
created by:
David Austin Roses

at a glance

Soil: damp, acidic, sand
Sun:
  
Zones: 4a thru 8b
Care:
average
Lifespan:
perennial
Category:   
Attributes:

fall interest, bee attracting

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description for "Modern Roses: Rosa 'Susan Williams-Ellis'"

Rosa 'Susan Williams-Ellis' (Ausquirk) – Approximately 135 petals. Repeat-flowering. This exceptional rose is a "sport," or naturally occurring form, of Austin's popular pink rose 'The Mayflower' which was introduced in 2001. Good white roses are particularly difficult to breed, so it was with great delight that the team at David Austin discovered this new white rose, which shares the vigorous disease resistance of the pink rose. Like its parent, it also flowers very early in the season – two to three weeks before most other roses – and then continues to bloom nearly non-stop until the harder frosts. This rose is an excellent performer in most areas of the U.S. Those in cooler areas, including USDA zone 4, will welcome this exciting addition to the list of particularly winter hardy Austin roses. The fragrance is strong and old rose in character. This rose has a demure character and charm that makes it especially alluring to admirers of the heritage style of rose. The rose is named after Susan Williams-Ellis, a friend of David Austin and his wife Pat. She was an artist and influential pottery designer who, together with her husband Euan Cooper-Willis, established Portmeirion Pottery, best known for its Botanical Garden Tableware series. She was a great enthusiast of English Roses and painted beautiful watercolors of them. Grows to approximately 4 feet x 3 feet. Best suited to USDA zones 4 - 8.

History:

David Austin Spring 2011

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