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Crocus: Crocus vernus 'Purpureus Grandiflorus'

Botanical name: Crocus vernus 'Purpureus Grandiflorus'

Common name: Dutch crocus

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Planted
1
time

Sprite
created by:
chief cultivator

Mercer island, Wa

at a glance

Soil: damp, neutral, sand
Sun:
  
  
Zones: 3a thru 8b
Care:
easy
Lifespan:
perennial
Category:   
Attributes:

deer resistant

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description for "Crocus: Crocus vernus 'Purpureus Grandiflorus'"

'Purpureus Grandiflorus' produces fine oval flowers of deep violet-purple with a purple base. For many gardeners, these are one of the most welcomed and familiar flowers of early spring. 'Purpureus Grandiflorus' is lovely in rock gardens, naturalized in lawns or grouped together under trees and shrubs. Dutch crocuses are trouble-free. Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Plant corms about 2-3" deep and 2-3" apart in the fall. If planted in the lawn, crocuses should be grouped and left unmowed until foliage yellows in late spring. --edited by dtd siegelgirl

History:

Large flowering crocuses are among the most widely grown early spring bulbs (actually corms). Each 'Purpureus Grandiflorus' corm produces several upright, cuplike, deep velvety purple flowers on stems rising to 4-6" above basal, grass-like leaves. Versatile and easy to grow. Blooms shortly after snowdrops (Galanthus). Naturalizes well. Problems: No serious insect or disease problems. Squirrels, mice and other rodents can be problems. Squirrels seem particularly adept at locating, digging up and eating newly planted corms.

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