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Nice Grape Leaves, But No Grapes

by daisy


I purchased a grape tree from Home Depot about 3 years ago, as I always wanted to try to grow grapes. I can't remember the name of the variety, but they were light green on the carton. I planted it against a brick wall of my mother's house. It gets plenty of sun and produces big leaves, and the vine climbs a cable my brother uses for his ham radio. The problem--I've been unable to grow any grapes. Is it the soil? Am I under fertilizing it? How can I get grapes to grow?   

Tags

grape tree, grape vine

comments

more adivice.... <br/> <br/>*Prune well when the vines are dormant. <br/>*Make sure to fertilize during fruiting season <br/>*Have a good trellis or sturdy structure for them to grow on <br/>*Plant bee attracting flowers and plants around grape vines to promote pollination!
Sprite
FigTree commented on 11/06/10
I follow all of the above steps. The vine is at the right end of a vegetable border garden, with a row of tomatoes to the left and parsley and chives to the right. I even have some strawberries to the left of it (I don't protect the strawberries and the squirrels must eat them--I get flowers but the strawberries are snatched before they ripen on the vine.) There must be enough bees because tomatoes grow. It sounds like I'm not fertilizing them enough. The ground around the base is hard and I don't turn over the soil in May. Maybe I should be scratching the surface of the soil more. I use Plant Tone, but didn't fertilize on schedule and not frequently enough. A few years ago I tried to grow eggplant and they weren't very large. A friend of mine told me that they require a lot of fertilization. I tried growing them the next year and had to keep the squirrels away. They weren't as tasty as the eggplants from the local farm, so I never planted them again. I'm much better at flowers, but the money you save from planting your own vegetables is worth learning how to do it properly. Years ago, my mother used to successfully plant cucumbers and squash in a patch on the side of the house. Unfortunately, her neighbor put in arborvitae on the other side of the fence and the clippings soured the soil. The arborvitae became too large and were cut down to the ground. It may be worth turning over the soil and trying to grow vegetables there again. I'd have to look into whether anything else should be done with the soil, as I don't know how long the effect of the arborvitae lasts. Thanks for the advice.
Default_user_sprite
daisy replied: on 11/07/10
From Tom: <br/> <br/>Maybe with nice grape leaves try some greek cooking.
Sprite
FigTree commented on 11/06/10
From Janet: <br/> <br/>Ratio of nitrogen to phosphorous may be too high. Get soil tested?
Sprite
FigTree commented on 11/06/10
http://www.lmawby.com/index.php?route=/enjoy/writings/why-grapes-grow-here
Sprite
lisaktel commented on 11/06/10
Interesting dialogue. I never thought about slopes and valleys, or the lake effect. I think the vine gets enough sun during the day and the problem is not enough fertilization.
Default_user_sprite
daisy replied: on 11/07/10
OK- I personally do not know anything about grapes or grape vines, but I think it has to do with fertilization. I am sending your question out into the eathers of the internet and we&#x27;ll see what comes back our way!
Sprite
FigTree commented on 11/06/10

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