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The Kitchen Garden: Basics

by dig the dirt editor

Long before grocery stores and mega markets offered produce for sale, kitchen gardens fed the world. On small homesteads, the garden was located right outside the kitchen door, where ripe and shining vegetables were just minutes away from a boiling soup or a simmering stew. Because of their utilitarian nature, garden designs were simple: rows of beans, potatoes, and tomatoes were laid out for ease of care and harvest. The choices of produce were tried-and-true varieties that yielded delicious, nutritious, and storable food.

 

 

Get An Early Start | Warm Weather Crops | Wide-Row Planting 

Growing Up | Tips for a Successful Kitchen Garden

 

 

THE FIRST FAST FOOD RESTAURANTS
The kitchen gardens of today haven’t changed much from their predecessors. They still yield the tastes and textures of the kitchen gardens of the past; there are heirloom vegetable varieties you can grow and newer hybrids created for disease resistance and bigger yields. But the purpose of the kitchen garden has remained true to its origins—a plot of ground where you can grow delicious food for your family.

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CREATING YOUR KITCHEN GARDEN
What goes into a kitchen garden? Review your own eating and dining habits and you decide. You can grow the ingredients for country Italian dishes, (tomatoes, oregano, onions, garlic), Mexican food (tomatillos, peppers, cilantro ) or soul food (collards, onions, mustard greens ). In fact, your kitchen garden can be a horticultural United Nations by planting vegetables, herbs, and fruits from all over the world.

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START WITH A PLOT OF GROUND
A kitchen garden is easy to create. Here are some guidelines:

  1. Locate a sunny spot of ground (most vegetables must receive 6 hours of sun a day).
  2. Till or spade the area. Add in soil amendments such as sphagnum peat moss, compost, or well-rotted manure as you work.
  3. Plant seedlings or seeds of your favorite vegetables and herbs. Make sure to mark the rows of vegetables with plant markers, so that you can keep track of what is planted where.

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Tags

vegetables, edibles, organic, how to, edible, kitchen

comments

NICE!! I love the combination of pest detering flowers with the veggies. This garden is both beautiful and functional!
Sprite
Lily commented on 09/27/09

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