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Perennial Herbs: care guide

by dig the dirt editor

Perennial is a relative word, and a plant that is perennial in Dallas, Texas, may be treated as an annual or tender perennial in Des Moines, Iowa. Use this guide to help you figure out what type your herb is.

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Perennials are plants that come back year after year—though some live longer than others. Perennial is a relative word, and a plant that is perennial in Dallas, Texas, may be treated as an annual or tender perennial in Des Moines, Iowa. Examples of perennial herbs include oreganos, mints, thymes, chives, French tarragon, winter savory, culinary sages, English lavenders, germanders, and catnips.

                                     Mint.detail

                                                                 MINT

                                      Chives.detail                                                                 CHIVES

                                     Winter-savory.detail                                                                    WINTER SAVORY

 

CARING FOR PERENNIAL HERBS


Perennial herbs come back year after year and can be planted directly in the garden. Most oreganos, mints, thymes, chives, French tarragon, winter savory, culinary sages, English lavenders, germanders, catnips and santolinas are perennials.

Although lavenders require a well-drained, slightly alkaline soil, most other are not picky about soil type. They do however need plenty of room - at least 12-18" between plants. Mints require special attention because they grow and spread rapidly. We recommend confining them in large 12" rubber pots sunk into the ground, or situating them at some distance from your other valuable plants. They can easily take over a small garden if not controlled in some way.

The US Department of Agriculture has developed a hardiness zone chart which is widely used by American gardeners, and which is referenced by virtually all commercial growers. If you are not familiar with these hardiness zones, or do not know in which zone you live, click here to go to a zone map.

Tags

Herbs, Perennials, CHIVE, Mint, WINTER SAVORY, care guide

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